Mammal Web February Update

Vivien Kent Mammal Web, News, Uncategorized


February was the last month of the meteorological winter – but nobody told nature that – and it was still quite quiet on the Mammal Web cameras. Though there has still been enough activity for the number of images uploaded to the Mammal Web website to approach 45,000. At this stage we really do need as many people as possible to help the project by registering as a Spotter and classifying images.

Pen-Yuan Hsing, who is the Durham University PhD student working on the project, has carried out some preliminary analysis of the data gathered so far. The graph below shows the number of photos that have been uploaded across the life of the project (grey area) and the number that have been classified at least once (black area).

photos

Photos uploaded and photos classified by at least one Spotter

The following bar chart shows the number of photos which have been ‘Spotted’ a certain number of times. As you can see, roughly 6000 photos have been Spotted twice.

Chart showing the number of times photos have been Spotted

Chart showing the number of times photos have been Spotted

Pen has also looked at the activity patterns of roe deer, which is the mammal species that has been photographed the most times to date. The chart below illustrates that they are active throughout the day with a period of lower activity around midday.

Chart showing times of day at which roe deer were photographed

Chart showing times of day at which roe deer were photographed

Although February was quite quiet we were treated to a weekly appearance by a tawny owl (OK so it’s not a mammal but it’s still nice to see) on the Rainton Meadows’ camera. It seemed to be bringing its prey into the cover of the trees to eat – lucky for us that it chose to do it in front of the camera.

Tawny owl posing for the camera at Rainton Meadows

Tawny owl posing for the camera at Rainton Meadows

There was also quite a lot of brown hare activity at Rainton in February with regular images of one or two hares chasing each other.

Brown hare running through the woods

Brown hare running through the woods

Trapper Christine sent in this lovely image of  a roe deer from her camera.

Roe deer in the woods

Roe deer in the woods

And although this stoat image from Trapper Keith was taken in January he didn’t find it until he checked his camera in February. Lovely daytime shot.

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Stoat in the grass

Looking ahead, we will be training up some new Trappers this month and we are looking forward to Spring and to seeing some interesting images of our mammals as they breed and start moving more around the landscape.